Top 5 Saturday: The Longest Books I’ve Read

Welcome back to another Top 5 Saturday! Just in case you don’t know Top 5 Saturday is a weekly meme created by Mandy @ Devouring Books and it’s where we list the top five books (they can be books on your TBR, favourite books, books you loved/hated) based on the week’s topic. You can see the upcoming schedule at the end of my post 🙂 This week’s topic is actually: Longest Books (Books you’ve rad, on your TBR.)

I usually look at books that are on my TBR for my Saturday posts but I feel like I’ve already looked at the biggest books on my to-read list quite a few times already so I thought it’d be fun to take a look back at the longest books I have read. I had a few predictions for some titles but I was surprised to find only one of my ‘predictions’ made it onto this list, and it was the shortest of the lot! I also focused this list on books that are standalones or the first books in a series, so there were a couple that were even longer than the ones mentioned here but they were all the third or even fifth and sixth books in a series. All that being said, here are some of the biggest chonksters I’ve managed to tackle:

UNDER THE DOME
(1,074PGS)

Book cover: Under the Dome

On an entirely normal, beautiful fall day in Chester’s Mill, Maine, the town is inexplicably and suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field. Planes crash into it and fall from the sky in flaming wreckage, a gardener’s hand is severed as “the dome” comes down on it, people running errands in the neighboring town are divided from their families, and cars explode on impact. No one can fathom what this barrier is, where it came from, and when—or if—it will go away.
Dale Barbara, Iraq vet and now a short-order cook, finds himself teamed with a few intrepid citizens—town newspaper owner Julia Shumway, a physician’s assistant at the hospital, a selectwoman, and three brave kids. Against them stands Big Jim Rennie, a politician who will stop at nothing—even murder—to hold the reins of power, and his son, who is keeping a horrible secret in a dark pantry. But their main adversary is the Dome itself. Because time isn’t just short. It’s running out.


THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH
(976PGS)

Book cover: The Pillars of the Earth

Everything readers expect from Follett is here: intrigue, fast-paced action, and passionate romance. But what makes The Pillars of the Earth extraordinary is the time the twelfth century; the place feudal England; and the subject the building of a glorious cathedral. Follett has re-created the crude, flamboyant England of the Middle Ages in every detail. The vast forests, the walled towns, the castles, and the monasteries become a familiar landscape. Against this richly imagined and intricately interwoven backdrop, filled with the ravages of war and the rhythms of daily life, the master storyteller draws the reader irresistibly into the intertwined lives of his characters into their dreams, their labors, and their loves: Tom, the master builder; Aliena, the ravishingly beautiful noblewoman; Philip, the prior of Kingsbridge; Jack, the artist in stone; and Ellen, the woman of the forest who casts a terrifying curse. From humble stonemason to imperious monarch, each character is brought vividly to life. The building of the cathedral, with the almost eerie artistry of the unschooled stonemasons, is the center of the drama. Around the site of the construction, Follett weaves a story of betrayal, revenge, and love, which begins with the public hanging of an innocent man and ends with the humiliation of a king.


FALL OF GIANTS
(850PGS)

Book cover: Fall of Giants

Five families are brought together through the world-shaking dramas of the First World War, the Russian Revolution and the struggle for votes for women. It’s 1911, and the coronation day of King George V. Thirteen-year-old Billy Williams begins his first day at work in a coal mine. Drama and intrigue unfold as Fall of Giants moves seamlessly from Washington to St Petersburg, from the dirt and danger of a coal mine to the glittering chandeliers of a palace, from the corridors of power to the bedrooms of the mighty. As always, Ken Follett’s richly developed historical background only enhances fast-moving action and powerful emotion of this absorbing narrative.


THE PRIORY OF THE ORANGE TREE
(848PGS)

Book cover: The Priory of the Orange Tree

A world divided. A queendom without an heir. An ancient enemy awakens.
The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction – but assassins are getting closer to her door.
Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic.
Across the dark sea, Tané has trained to be a dragonrider since she was a child, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel. Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep.


A LITTLE LIFE
(816PGS)

Book cover: A Little Life

A Little Life follows four college classmates—broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition—as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. While their relationships, which are tinged by addiction, success, and pride, deepen over the decades, the men are held together by their devotion to the brilliant, enigmatic Jude, a man scarred by an unspeakable childhood trauma. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara’s stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves.

 

FEB/MAR SCHEDULE:

Have you read any of these chonksters? Do you like to read chonky books or do you prefer books of a shorter length? Any chonky favourites?

15 thoughts on “Top 5 Saturday: The Longest Books I’ve Read

  1. I’ve never even heard of Under the Dome!! And I have Pillars of the Earth on my shelf. I’m a bit scared of that beast, though. 😉

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Lol I feel you both on that front. I still haven’t finished the series cos… It was intense but I also started with one of Follett’s more ‘modern’ series and I enjoyed that so much more. I’m wondering if this chonkster would be better as an audiobook though!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I feel like Under the Dome is one of King’s lesser known works? I don’t know. It was my first King book though 😂 Pillars of the Earth is definitely a scary beast but I’m wondering if an audiobook might make it more appealing… 🤔

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Love this! I had a couple of 900+ page books last year that were great fun (To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini and The Burning White by Brent Weeks) but luckily they were both so good that they held my attention.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I *think* I want to read To Sleep in a Sea of Stars but it’s pretty intimidating 😂 That is one thick as book! Haha but I would still buy it just for the cover alone cos it’s so pretty!

      Like

    1. Haha, totally feel that. I was going through a ‘chonky books’ phase after another of Follett’s series (which also has crazy big books) but Pillars of the Earth was… particularly trying to get through at times 😂

      Liked by 1 person

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